FAMILY PLANNING: IRETI EDA” Radio Program Returns


“IRETI EDA” Radio Program Returns: Weekly Program to Air in Oyo State

 

The “Get It Together” Campaign, led by the Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative 2 (NURHI 2), will launch 26 new episodes of their weekly radio program – Ireti Eda – during the week of July 14, 2017.

 

The new episodes of Ireti Eda in Oyo continues the captivating drama it was known for intermixed with real-life testimonials from community leaders, health service providers, and program listeners. This combination of entertaining and educational content encourages all Nigerians and Oyo people in particular to KNOW the facts about family planning, TALK to their partner, and GO for family planning services – the key message of NURHI 2’s Get It Together campaign.

 

“I like the radio program Ireti Eda because it educates us on Family Planning, especially through the drama characters, highlighting the need, importance and methods of Family Planning. I do not miss any episode as I have learnt a lot from the expert that answers questions also, as some of the things they said are things I have experienced as a woman. The program is very good and It it should be continued.” Bunmi.

 

As in the previous three seasons, this radio program will feature the latest jams, real-life stories from satisfied family planning users, and the chance to win weekly prize, which will be N1,000 recharge cards. The programs will also offer listeners the opportunity to call-in and speak directly with family planning experts, who answer their questions live on-air.

 

Dr Mojisola Odeku, NURHI 2 Portfolio Director said “Listeners are hooked on the programs’ serial dramas and know they can trust the project to provide factual and accurate health information. Fans can even call-in to the program to have their questions answered by family planning experts, one of the more popular features.”

 

The new episodes of Ireti Eda radio program build on the success of the first seasons, NURHI 1’s popular radio programs, and the campaign’s 2016 hit song “Get It Together,” featuring Paul ‘P Square’ Okoye and Tiwa Savage. At the same time, NURHI 2 has helped establish a network of trained health providers offering friendly and confidential family planning services. NURHI 2 locations can be recognized by the blue, yellow and orange puzzle piece logo with signs that say ‘FP services available here.’

 

The new episodes’ premiere dates, radio stations, and broadcast times are as follows:

 

Oyo:

-Splash 105.5FM: Fridays 3-4pm (Start date: July 14)

-Amuludun 99.1FM: Mondays 3-4pm (Start Date: July 17)

 

Radio listeners can join in the conversation and see what other fans are saying on Get It Together’s official Facebook page: @getittogetherng

 

For more information please visit www.nurhitoolkit.org, send an email to info@nurhi.org or call Toyeke on 0905-261-5272.

 

About the Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative 2 (NURHI 2)

The Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative 2 (NURHI 2) funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation/T. J. Mather is using communication to increase demand for family planning among men and women. It is led by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (JHCCP) in partnership with the Center for Communication Programs Nigeria (CCPN).

 

 

Decolonisation, Pluriversality, and African-situatedness in sexuality and sexuality-related violence research and advocacy


…to assist us to find ways to share the means and ways to work towards research and advocacy that are embedded in African publics, to overcome the dominant EuroAmerican hegemonic theories, research and ways of activation, to think in a world characterised by entanglement, to theorise from Africa for the world, as well as to control knowledge and the means of producing knowledge.

African Psychology

Aime_Cesaire 2

Colonisation, said Aimé Césaire, the anti-colonial Martiniquan poet and politician, equals “thingification”. To us this suggests that sexual thingification – including sexual entitlement, rape and femicide – equates sexual and gendered colonisation. What is needed to truly decolonise – that’s one question.

In Decolonising the mind, the Kenyan writer Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o argued for African languages and cultures. Noting that although imperialism may have introduced writing to many African languages, it denied many Africans the means to master the world irreparably cracked by colonialism by restricting reading and writing to a small class of the colonised who preferred the colonisers’ cultures and languages.

Concerned primarily with the decolonisation of science in its broad meaning, the Beninoise philosopher Paulin Hountondji contended that the key intertwined problems of colonial science are “theoretical emptiness”, “theoretical extraversion” that tempts many African researchers to respond and address themselves to non-African publics, and subordination to…

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By adejokeiyabadan Posted in REBLOGS